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Greetings, People of Wired

August 15th, 2013 · 96 Comments

So, first, I’m super flattered to have been included on Wired’s new “101 Signals” list of recommended writers on security and politics. As you may notice, however, I’m not writing all that frequently on those topics here on my personal site anymore. If you’re interested in that, therefore, you probably want to follow me on Twitter (where I usually link stuff I’m writing elsewhere) or check out my posts on the Cato Institute blog.

Second, as quite a few people have noticed, there’s an unfortunate paucity of women on the 101 signals list, which even leaving aside considerations of gender equity, left out many of the best writers and thinkers in this space. So, without any slight intended to the excellent resources flagged by Wired, let me suggest that if you’re coming here from that list, you’ll probably also find enormous value in the Women-in-Technology Twitter list maintained by formidable privacy & drones expert Amie Stepanovich.

If you’re specifically interested in the surveillance issues I focus on, Emptywheel by the invaluable Marcy Wheeler is essential reading, as is Michelle Richardson of the American Civil Liberties Union, and ACLU’s Kade, who blogs at PrivacySOS.  You should probably just follow everyone who works for the Electronic Frontier Foundation, but Rainey Reitman and Jillian York are two of their more fecund online voices. For journalists on the security beat, your feed should include Andrea Peterson, Kashmir Hill, Julia Angwin, and Siobhan Gorman. (I’ll assume only institutional humility forbade Wired from including their own Quinn Norton and Kim Zetter on their list.)  Among academics I scruple to even attempt a partial list because there are too many brilliant thinkers out there to catalog, but for starters you should keep up with Rachel Levinson-Waldman, Jennifer Granick, Helen Nissenbaum, and Kate Crawford. This could be a much, much longer list, but start there and you’re bound to find others worth reading—or add links to your own favorite thinkers in this space in the comments.

Addendum: I note my own list is a bit melanin deficient; I tried to think of some women of color who regularly write for a popular audience on privacy/tech/surveillance/security issues and sadly came up short.  So, again, suggestions welcome in the comments.

Tags: Tech and Tech Policy


       

 

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